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THE GRAND JUNCTION CANAL
A HIGHWAY LAID WITH WATER.

 

The authors’ text may be used for any scholarly or educational purpose without prior permission so long as you credit this website.

 

In Tring Cutting.

PART I. ― BACKGROUND


Chapter I. - Transport Evolution


Chapter II. - The Parliamentary Hurdle


Chapter III. - The Canal Builders


Chapter IV. - Canal Engineering


Tring Cutting

PART II. ― BUILDING THE CANAL


Chapter V. - The Personalities


Chapter VI. - The Idea Takes Hold


Chapter VII. - the Construction Project



 

This 50 h.p. Bolinder 2-cylinder diesel was used to drive a water pump that lifted water 45 feet from the bottom to the top of the Knowle flight of locks near Solihull. It was installed as part of the 1930s Grand Union Canal modernisation programme, and remained in service until replaced by an electric motor in the 1970s.



PART III. ― THE ROUTE


Chapter VIII. - Braunston Junction to Marsworth Junction



Chapter IX.   - Marsworth to Uxbridge



Chapter X.    - Uxbridge to Brentford, and the Paddington Arm


Paddington Basin, once the London terminus of the Grand Junction Canal.


PART IV. ― THE COMING OF THE RAILWAYS


Chapter XI. - The Railway Onslaught


Chapter XII. - The Years of Decline (I.)


Chapter XIII. - The Years of Decline (II.)


Foxton Locks on the ‘old’ Grand Union Canal.  The locks shown above are an example of a
 staircase of which this flight has two, each of five locks separated by a passing pond.
 

 

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