Baron's Yule Feast
Home Autobiography Thoughts at Fourscore Gulf of Time Old Fashioned Stories Self-help Prison Rhymes, etc. Baron's Yule Feast Purgatory of Suicides Paradise of Martyrs Poets of the Poor Reviews, etc. Main Index Site Search
 


 

 



THE

BARON'S YULE FEAST
_______________________


TO

THE COUNTESS OF BLESSINGTON.
__________________


Lady, receive a tributary lay
        From one who cringeth not to titled state
        Conventional, and lacketh will to prate
Of comeliness ― though thine, to which did pay
The haughty Childe his tuneful homage, may
        No minstrel deem a harp-theme derogate.
        I reckon thee among the truly great
And fair, because with genius thou dost sway
The thought of thousands, while thy noble heart
        With pity glows for Suffering, and with zeal
Cordial relief and solace to impart.
        Thou didst, while I rehearsed Toil's wrongs, reveal
Such yearnings!   Plead! let England hear thee plead
With eloquent tongue, that Toil from wrong be freed!


――――♦――――


ADVERTISEMENT.


SEVERAL pieces in the following Rhyme were written many years ago, and will be recognised by my early friends.  They were the fruit of impressions derived from the local associations of boyhood, (of which, the reader, if inclined, may learn more in the notes,) and of an admiration created by the exquisite beauty and simplicity of Coleridge's 'Christabel,' ― which I had by heart, and used to repeat to Thomas Miller, my playmate and companion from infancy, during many a delightful 'Day in the Woods,' and pleasing ramble on the hills and in the woods above Gainsborough, and along the banks of Trent.

    I offer but one apology for the production of a metrical essay, composed chiefly of imperfect and immature pieces: ― the ambition to contribute towards the fund of Christmas entertainment, in which agreeable labour I see many popular names engaged, ― and among them, one, the most deservedly popular in the literature of the day.  The favour with which an influential portion of the press has received my 'Prison Rhyme' emboldens me to take this step; and if the flagellation of criticism be not too keenly dealt upon me for the imperfections in the few pages that follow, I will be content, in this instance, to expect no praise.

134, Blackfriars Road,
    Dec. 20. 1845.

――――♦――――

Ed.―the following table of contents, which is not in Cooper's original, has been added to ease reference.



CONTENTS.
_________
 

CANTO I.

PRELUDE
I.II.

THE DAUGHTER OF PLANTAGENET
THE STRANGER MINSTREL'S TALE
I. II. III.
_________


CANTO II.

PRELUDE

THE WOODMAN'S SONG

THE MINSTREL'S SONG

THE MILLER OF ROCHE
THE LAY BROTHER OF SAINT LEONARD'S TABLE
_________


CANTO III.

PRELUDE

SIR RAYMOND AND THE FALSE PALMER
THE STRANGER MINSTREL'S SECOND TALE
_________


CANTO IV.

PRELUDE

THE GOSHERD'S SONG

THE SWINEHERD'S SONG

THE WOODMAN'S LOVE SONG

THE BARON'S DAUGHTER'S SONG

THE MINSTREL'S RESPONSE

THE LAY-BROTHER'S LOVE SONG

THE MINSTREL'S AVOWAL

THE MINSTREL'S FAREWELL
_________


NOTES.

――――♦――――



LONDON:
Printed by A. S
POTTISWOODE,
New-Street-Square.

 



[Home] [Autobiography] [Thoughts at Fourscore] [Gulf of Time] [Old Fashioned Stories] [Self-help] [Prison Rhymes, etc.] [Baron's Yule Feast] [Purgatory of Suicides] [Paradise of Martyrs] [Poets of the Poor] [Reviews, etc.] [Main Index] [Site Search]

Correspondence should be sent to Webmaster@Gerald-Massey.org.uk