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BYGONES WORTH REMEMBERING

BY

GEORGE JACOB HOLYOAKE

 

"The best prophet of the future is the past"
                                                                  LORD BYRON




VOLUME I



NEW YORK

E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY
31 WEST TWENTY-THIRD STREET
1905
_______________________

 



Preface


IF the preface of a book be a plea to the reader, its force must lie in the aims of the author.  In the following pages his main aim has been to be of service to somebody.  That is a principle, which, amid the ravelment, perplexity, and entanglements of the world, always finds a pathway open.  Such a principle is as an All-Seeing Eye, to which he who acknowledges it, is amenable, since it makes plain to him the devious, time-serving byways he should avoid.

    The writer has no interest, no taste, no trust, save in definite, verifiable ideas.  His aim has been to keep clear of the Sin of Pretension, which consists in declaring, or assuming to be true, that which the writer or speaker does not know to be true.  What errors negligence of this rule has bred!  What misdirection it has perpetuated!  Into how many labyrinths, where truth was not to be found, has it led men!  What can be more useful, or holier, than inciting the reader to beware of pretension in speech, in morals, in politics, and in piety?  To keep as clear as possible of this universal sin may serve many and mislead none.

    Professor Jowett has told us that "where Inquiry is denied at the door, Doubt gets in at the window."  This is the way it came to the writer of this preface, and accounts for a certain liberty of expression the reader may meet with, if he ventures further into these pages.

    A sentence of Mr. Allen Upward will sufficiently describe the spirit of this book: "Let us try to tolerate each other instead of trying to convert each other."  The author disclaims belonging to that class who have "great expectations," which are as vain in literature as in life.  The utmost the author looks forward to is that semi-friendly applause which is accorded to a platform speaker, not so much for any merit in his oration as for his unexpected consideration for the audience by concluding.

G. J. HOLYOAKE.

_______________________

Contents
(VOLUME 1.)


CHAPTER I.
CONCERNING BYGONES

CHAPTER II.
PERSONAL INCIDENTS

CHAPTER III.
OTHER INSTANCES

CHAPTER IV.
FIRST STEPS IN LITERATURE

CHAPTER V.
GEORGE ELIOT AND GEORGE HENRY LEWES

CHAPTER VI.
WHEN BIRMINGHAM WAS A TOWN

CHAPTER VII.
THE TENTH OF APRIL, 1848—ITS INCREDIBILITIES

CHAPTER VIII.
THE CHARTISTS OF FICTION

CHAPTER IX.
THE OLD POSTILLION

CHAPTER X.
MEETING BREAKERS—LIST OF THOSE PAID FOR DOING IT

CHAPTER XI.
TROUBLE WITH HER MAJESTY

CHAPTER XII.
UNFORESEEN QUALITIES IN PUBLIC MEN

CHAPTER XIII.
THE COBDEN SCHOOL

CHAPTER XIV.
HARRIET MARTINEAU, THE DEAF GIRL OF NORWICH.

CHAPTER XV.
FURTHER INCIDENTS IN HER SINGULAR CAREER.

CHAPTER XVI.
THE THREE NEWMANS

CHAPTER XVII.
MAZZINI IN ENGLAND—INCIDENTS IN HIS CAREER

CHAPTER XVIII.
MAZZINI THE CONSPIRATOR

CHAPTER XIX.
GARIBALDI, THE SOLDIER OF LIBERTY

CHAPTER XX.
THE STORY OF THE BRITISH LEGION, NEVER BEFORE TOLD

CHAPTER XXI.
JOHN STUART MILL, TEACHER OF THE PEOPLE

CHAPTER XXII.
JOHN STUART MILL, TEACHER OF THE PEOPLE

CHAPTER XXIII.
ABOUT MR. GLADSTONE


____________________

 
BYGONES WORTH REMEMBERING

BY

GEORGE JACOB HOLYOAKE

 

"Look backward only to correct an error of conduct for the next attempt"

GEORGE MEREDITH




VOLUME II



NEW YORK

E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY
31 WEST TWENTY-THIRD STREET
1905


_______________________

Contents
(VOLUME 2.)


CHAPTER XXIV.
CONVERSATIONS WITH MR. GLADSTONE

CHAPTER XXV.
HERBERT SPENCER, THE THINKER

CHAPTER XXVI.
SINGULAR CAREER OF MR. DISRAELI

CHAPTER XXVII.
CHARACTERISTICS OF JOSEPH COWEN. I.

CHAPTER XXVIII.
CHARACTERISTICS OF JOSEPH COWEN. II.

CHAPTER XXIX.
THE PERIL OF SCRUPLES

CHAPTER XXX.
TAKING SIDES

CHAPTER XXXI.
THINGS WHICH WENT AS THEY WOULD

CHAPTER XXXII.
STORY OF THE LAMBETH PALACE GROUNDS

CHAPTER XXXIII.
SOCIAL WONDERS ACROSS THE WATER

CHAPTER XXXIV.
THE ESTABLISHED CHURCH AT SEA

CHAPTER XXXV.
ADVENTURES IN THE STREET

CHAPTER XXXVI.
LIMPING THRIFT

CHAPTER XXXVII.
MISTRUST OF MODERATION

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
PENAL CHRISTIANITY

CHAPTER XXXIX.
TWO SUNDAYS

CHAPTER XL.
BYWAYS OF LIBERTY

CHAPTER XLI.
LAWYERS' LICENCE

CHAPTER XLII.
CHRISTIAN DAYS

CHAPTER XLIII.
NEW CONVICTIONS WHICH CAME UNSOUGHT

CHAPTER XLIV.
DIFFICULTY OF KNOWING MEN

CHAPTER XLV.
IDEAS FOR THE YOUNG

CHAPTER XLVI.
EXPERIENCES ON THE WARPATH

CHAPTER XLVII.
LOOKING BACKWARDS

 


 

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